May 1, 2021 — You Have to Know Before You can Remember

“I was talking with a neighbor last night,” Stan commented, “and I had a wonderful opportunity to talk with him about the truth of Jesus and what He accomplished through His finished work on the cross.”

“What was that?” I asked.

“He was telling me that his wife had asked him to go to the store and pick up some things for dinner.  Apparently he wasn’t listening real carefully and got home without some of the things that were needed.  When his wife asked him why he had forgotten to pick up some milk and butter, he said he didn’t know he was supposed to get them.”

“So,” I responded, “he couldn’t remember to get what he didn’t know he was supposed to get!”

“That was the exact point I was able to talk with him about Jesus, His finished work on the cross, why it’s important to remember, but that you have to know before you can remember.”

“How’d you do that?” I asked.

“I related it to what both Jesus said and what the apostle Paul wrote about why we celebrate communion in the church.”

“And why is that?”

“So we will remember that Jesus gave Himself, all of Himself, so that we can have life eternally with the Father when it’s time to step into eternity.”

“But before we can remember what Jesus did, we have to know what He did, is that the point?” I asked.

“Exactly,” Stan replied.  “If I don’t know, I can’t remember.  And this applies to everything about my faith walk.  That is why I think it is so crucial to pursue the eternal life of knowing God the Father and Jesus the Son.  If I don’t know, I can’t remember.  And if there’s nothing for me to remember, where am I in my relationship with God?”

“As well,” I pointed out, “that seems like a good reason to tell everyone about what God the Father and Jesus accomplished, so that those other people, as well, can remember.”

“And pass it on,” Stan replied with a smile.

________________________________

Bible verses to consider:

. . . the Lord Jesus in the night in which He was betrayed took bread; and when He had given thanks, He broke it, and said, “This is My body, which is for you, do this in remembrance of Me.”  In the same way He took the cup also after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in My blood; do this, as often as you drink it in remembrance of Me.  1 Corinthians 11:23-25.

And having taken some bread, when He had given thanks, He broke it and gave it to them, saying, “This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me.”  Luke 22:19.

And this is eternal life, that they may know Thee, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom Thou hast sent.  John 17:3.

Prayer:  Thank you, Father, for giving your only begotten Son so that all who believe can have life eternally with you.  Thank you for those who brought me to the truth so I could accept your free and gracious provision by faith.  Thank you for the celebration of communion when we can remember what Jesus accomplished by His finished work on the cross.  I admit that too often I do not remember with all of the thanksgiving you intend.  And often there are things I do not remember about you and Jesus because I do not know and, therefore, I cannot remember.  Please lead and help me to follow you into the deepest possible relationship so I not only know you as you intend, but I also remember what you have for me to know.  Thank you I can and do bring these prayers before you in the name of Jesus.  Amen.

Think on this:  You can’t remember what you don’t know.  Are there things you purposefully don’t know so you don’t have to remember them?  If so, what is that all about?  How could that sort of attitude relate to a person’s relationship with God?  Have you ever been in that situation?  What is the best way for you to remember all that God has done and is doing for you?  Do you want to know so you will remember?  Why or why not?  If you do want to be able to remember, how is that going to happen? Are there people in your life who can’t remember what God has done for them because they don’t know? Are you going to tell them?

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